The Dreaded Black Burger of Tokyo

I’m pretty strict about keeping this blog developer-related, so please forgive me this one off-topic post.

I’ve been in Tokyo this week for work, and on Monday I was walking passed a McDonald’s in Ochanomizu when I was struck by the following poster out the front.

Why, McDonalds, why?

My first reaction was one of amazement. Amazement that McDonald’s had managed to make itself even less appealing to me than it already was.

Read On…

Running FireMonkey apps on the Beaglebone Black

This is the Beaglebone Black

Beaglebone Black

It’s a single-board computer, about the size of a credit card. It’s powered by an ARM Cortex A8 and includes the NEON floating point accelerator. Happily that matches nicely with the Android device requirements for RAD Studio and AppMethod.

When I saw that, I wondered what it would take to deploy a FireMonkey app to it. Like most things, it’s pretty easy once you know how, but it took me a few false starts to get it all figured out. Further, much of the information online assumes you’ll be doing this from Linux. Given my aim of running FireMonkey apps on the Beaglebone, I really wanted to show the steps from Windows.

So here they are.

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ShowModal on Android

FireMonkey does a lot of work to allow you to write one set of code that compiles and runs on different platforms.

Not only that, it also does a lot of work to make many of the coding patterns that some of you are used to from the VCL on Windows, work unchanged on other platforms.

That’s great, but in some cases, re-using old patterns is not desirable. ShowModal is a case in point. Read On…

“No Code” Calculated Fields in RAD Studio and AppMethod

In Perth last week I was showing the new FieldOptions property on datasets. As part of the demo, I had to create a calculated field, and when I brought up the New Field dialog an audience member suggested I create an InternalCalc field instead.

I’d never heard of an InternalCalc field at the time, so later I did some research into what they are. In FireDAC they do everything a normal Calculated Field does, but in addition, you can define the value using the DefaultExpression property of the field, rather than having to write an OnCalcFields event handler.

Read On…