WTF is a Future?

Of the abstractions introduced in the Parallel Programming Library, the IFuture<T> seems to be the one that many people have difficulty understanding.

Both TTask and TParallel.For seem reasonably easy to understand conceptually, even if you don’t understand all the details. TTask is about some code you want to run in parallel to the main thread. TParallel.For is about performing some actions on the items in a collection in parallel. In both cases you are focussed on the actions you want to perform. Read On…

Smartwatches: Should I care?

I’ve had the Moto 360 smartwatch for a few weeks now, and I’ve been puzzling about something during that time.

Lots of people have asked me about it, and the most common question is “Is it useful?”. That’s an easy one to answer: Yes, it’s useful. But the real question I think they are asking is “Is it $300 useful?”, or more accurately, “Should I care?”. This is what I’ve been trying to figure out.

Read On…

XE7 VCL Events in Asia Pacific During November

We have a bunch of RAD Studio XE7 events coming up in APAC over the next month or so. They are free, half day sessions focussed on modernising existing VCL applications, where you’ll learn topics such as:

  • New VCL components, such as TaskBar and JumpList and how to easily add them to existing apps
  • Using the new Parallel Programming Library to improve the performance of your application
  • Migrating a BDE application to FireDAC
  • Extending an existing VCL application with a mobile companion app using App Tethering

 

The current list of cities, along with links to more details are:

Read On…

The Dreaded Black Burger of Tokyo

I’m pretty strict about keeping this blog developer-related, so please forgive me this one off-topic post.

I’ve been in Tokyo this week for work, and on Monday I was walking passed a McDonald’s in Ochanomizu when I was struck by the following poster out the front.

Why, McDonalds, why?

My first reaction was one of amazement. Amazement that McDonald’s had managed to make itself even less appealing to me than it already was.

Read On…

Running FireMonkey apps on the Beaglebone Black

This is the Beaglebone Black

Beaglebone Black

It’s a single-board computer, about the size of a credit card. It’s powered by an ARM Cortex A8 and includes the NEON floating point accelerator. Happily that matches nicely with the Android device requirements for RAD Studio and AppMethod.

When I saw that, I wondered what it would take to deploy a FireMonkey app to it. Like most things, it’s pretty easy once you know how, but it took me a few false starts to get it all figured out. Further, much of the information online assumes you’ll be doing this from Linux. Given my aim of running FireMonkey apps on the Beaglebone, I really wanted to show the steps from Windows.

So here they are.

Read On…