Archive for the ‘Mobile’ Category

Expired Apple Intermediate Certificates and RAD Studio iOS Development

From the Code Partners blog :

Last week we were doing some updates for a customer on a C++Builder Android and iOS app. The Mac that we were using to do the code signing for iOS hadn’t been used for this before, so we needed to setup the Certificates and Provisioning Profiles for the customer’s account.

I always dread this part, as I’ve found it always takes longer and is more complicated than you expect. I’ve done it enough times now though that I thought I’d struck all the issues, however this time I found a new one that I thought I should document for anyone else (or my future self) who strikes it.

Read More >>

Smartwatches: Should I care?

I’ve had the Moto 360 smartwatch for a few weeks now, and I’ve been puzzling about something during that time.

Lots of people have asked me about it, and the most common question is “Is it useful?”. That’s an easy one to answer: Yes, it’s useful. But the real question I think they are asking is “Is it $300 useful?”, or more accurately, “Should I care?”. This is what I’ve been trying to figure out.

Read On…

ShowModal on Android

FireMonkey does a lot of work to allow you to write one set of code that compiles and runs on different platforms.

Not only that, it also does a lot of work to make many of the coding patterns that some of you are used to from the VCL on Windows, work unchanged on other platforms.

That’s great, but in some cases, re-using old patterns is not desirable. ShowModal is a case in point. Read On…

Where to get your IBLite and InterBase ToGo License Files?

I’ve had a couple of questions lately about where to get the free IBLite Deployment License and also the InterBase ToGo testing licenses that you are entitled to as RAD Studio XE5 customers.

The details are actually in the email you received when you bought XE5, the one that contained your XE5 serial number. However I know in some cases that email goes to the finance or purchasing department in an organisation, rather than the develoeprs. Further, if you are on maintenance, you don’t actually get that email. Read On…

Sneak Peek: Delphi, Android, ARM Assembler and Extra Awesomeness

Less than two years ago, Delphi was a windows-only development tool.

Think about that for a second. In less than 24 months, we’ve added native OSX support and native iOS support, with native Android support currently in beta.

Now, I’m as guilty as anyone of being impatient about features and fixes, but when I step back and view it like that, it’s an amazing change in just two years. This Engineering team astonishes me sometimes. Read On…

Programatically Disable the Idle Timer on iOS using the ObjectiveC Bridge

If you’ve got an iOS device, you’ve probably noticed that if you stop interacting with your device, after a little while it will turn off the screen and go to sleep. This makes perfect sense for devices that are battery challenged at the best of times, but one side effect of this is that whatever app is running will also stop.

For many apps, this is fine, but what if you don’t want your app to stop running? What if, like one project I’m working on currently, it is accepting input from the accelerometer and just because nobody is interacting with it right now, I still want it to record that accelerometer input? Read On…

Using the FM Messaging System for In-process Publish and Subscribe on Windows, OSX and iOS.

For quite awhile I’ve been using a messaging bus within my apps to de-couple different sub-systems from each other. I use this heavily in my MVVM-based apps to minimise the dependencies between my Views and ViewModels, but it applies to non-MVVM apps of reasonable complexity as well. Read On…

A Facebook-style layout for your mobile app

I’ve been working on a ShowCase App for the Delphi XE4 release, and as part of it I wanted to have a “drawer” layout. I first saw this in the iOS and Android Facebook app, but it has shown up in other apps since.

If you’re not familiar with this, it is where your main content takes up the bulk of the screen, except for a toolbar at the top. The toolbar has a “hamburger” button that slides the main content area over to the right to expose a second content area (often a menu) underneath. Read On…